The flowers attract many insects including butterflies such as Small Heath, Marbled White  and Common Blue, and day-flying Burnet moths with their vivid red on black spots. In turn birds are attracted to the site. Yellowhammers, White-throats, Bullfinches and Linnets can often be heard calling from the scrub, Green Woodpeckers can be seen feeding on ants and Goldfinches can be seen feeding on the Teasels in Winter. What ever the season, a walk through WLNR can offer something of interest.    
                
    Common Blue                                                          Small Heath    
       
Wildlife at the WLNR  

The reserve offers a variety of habitats. Secondary ash woodland grades into thorn scrub, with mature hedgerow bounding the western edge of the site. The open habitats include 2ha of rough unimproved neutral grassland which contains the notable Grass Vetchling, an area of ruderal habitat on imported chalky substrate with Cowslips, Bee Orchids and Thyme, and a pond/scape area where Ragged Robin and Meadowsweet grows. A wide variety of other plants can be found, including Spotted Orchids, Ox-eye Daisies, Black Knapweed, Heath and Lady's Bedstrawn to name a few.

Ox-eye Daisies                                                Cowslips                                                 Ragged Robin
Common Spotted Orchid                                    Grass Vetchling                                  Bee Orchid            
     

   
       




   Narrow-bordered 5-spot Burnet Moth                        Commophilia aeneana (Photo  Gianpie Ferrari)    
      
   
  



Commophilia aeneana, a yellow and metallic blue micro-moth that is scarce in Britain. The moth flies from May to July, and larvae feed in the roots of Hoary Ragwort that grows on the site.        
       
Further photographs of wildlife taken on the reserve can be seen in the Yahoo public photo album linked from the  HomePage    

   Narrow-bordered 5-spot Burnet Moth                        Commophilia aeneana (Photo  Gianpie Ferrari)    

Commophilia aeneana, a yellow and metallic blue micro-moth that is scarce in Britain. The moth flies from May to July, and larvae feed in the roots of Hoary Ragwort that grows on the site.        
       
Further photographs of wildlife taken on the reserve can be seen in the Yahoo public photo album linked from the  HomePage